Posts

,

How to Start Using Herbs with Your Family with Herbalist Kami McBride :073

Kami McBride is an herbalist and author whose mission is to change the culture in our houses, communities, and country to one that embraces and cultivates a relationship with plants in our every-day lives.

She takes herbal concepts and theories and translates them to practical, simple strategies that everyone can use to bring the gift and power of plants into every home and every community.  After decades of teaching, she has mastered the skill of bridging conceptual herbal knowledge with practical hands-on strategies to build personal relationships with plants so we can spread their magic throughout our homes and our communities.  Her four pillars of herbalism teach us these practical skills, and allow us to harness the gift the plants offer.

Listen to this podcast to hear:

  • What are the four pillars of herbal home care?
  • Why it’s important to use herbs every day to use them most effectively during illness.
  • How cultural “symptom suppression” deprogramming is essential in using herbalism effectively.
  • How herbal teas can be used as self-care rituals and family care.
  • How making your teas beautiful is part of the medicine of herbs.
  • How to meet people where they are when introducing them to herbalism.
  • How “herb sprinkles” can be used every meal to support digestion, nutrition, and health.
  • How herb-infused oils can be used to support lymph and decrease dryness.
  • How herbal oils are the “least amount of effort for maximum return”.
  • Why “when people get dry they get grouchy,” and how “oiling keeps us happy”.
  • How herbal oils can be used to nurture ourselves and teach our kids self-care.
  • “Nurture yourself and your child at the same time.” Herbalist Kami McBride
  • How herbal baths can be used for self-care and getting herbs into the body, and how to create herbal baths.
  • How getting out of the book and fostering your relationship with a few plants is key to home herbalism.
  • How using the herbs daily during calm times is crucial to using that connection during times when your brain is too tired or sick or crazy to think.
  • How changing our perception of herbalism to include giving back to the plants that give to us is crucial to sustain the culture of herbalism: “local food, local medicine, urban farm, and urban pharmacy.”

 

About Kami

Herbalist Kami McBride - LivingAwareness.com

Kami McBride is a clinical herbalist graduate of the Southwest School of Botanical Medicine (1991) and author of The Herbal Kitchen. Kami has taught herbal medicine in the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Department at University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing. She has helped thousands of families to use herbs and natural remedies for their self-care to prevent illness, take care of common ailments and protect their health naturally.

Find resources from Kami at LivingAwareness.com. Check out her incredibly practical and helpful book The Herbal Kitchen and Free Home Herbalism Video Masterclass.



 

 

 

 

 




, ,

How to Become a Wellness Coach and Nutrition and Herbal Professional with Lori Rose PhD :063

Becoming a Wellness Coach, Nutrition Professional and Herbalist are now easier and more affordable than ever!

Lori Rose, PhD teaches a coarse at Hill College that offers training for credentials in all three of these professions and in this interview we get to learn about her and how her own struggle with weight loss and health got her onto this path.

  • Are you interested in natural health and healing?
  • Do you want to learn more and help others?
  • Would an online program and affordable tuition (including financial aid) be ideal?

 

Here are the highlights of our talk:

  • How positive thinking changed her life
  • Learning that counting calories and measuring food (including carrying measuring cups in her purse) is not the way or a healthy way to lose weight.
  • Her experience and thoughts with being vegetarian and vegan
  • “I was not living life… may weight may have been going down, but I was not living live. I was all by myself, isolated, completely focused on food.” – Lori Rose, PhD
  • Some resources that helped Lori to make a big mental shift: Marianne Williamson, Eckart Tolle, Neale Donald Walsch
  • How her intention to get a full refund in 30 days for book that promised to change the reader’s life actually challenged her to follow the instructions full and she got amazing results! (and did not request a refund)
  • Gardening and companion planting.
  • Lori’s unique program offering through Hill College to earn credentials as: Holistic Nutritionist, Wellness Coach, Herbalist or/and Associate of Science degree
  • What is the difference between being a Holistic Nutritionist, Wellness Coach and General or Clinical Herbalist?
  • What is the difference between a General and Clinical Herbalist?
  • What can a person do with this education? What kind of setting would this person work in?
  • “Plants have their own unique qualities, their own energetics and so do people – and so it’s not just that someone with this diagnosis can take this herb. You have to figure out what are all the components of this person and what are all the components of these herbs and which one is the best one for that client. And you really can’t that deep into it without pursuing herbalism itself.” – Lori Rose, PhD
  • Contraindications – herb/drug and herb/person interactions
  • How long does it take to complete this program? – It’s designed to cover 4 semesters. It’s two fall and spring sessions. This aligns with an associate degree program.
  • What’s the difference being a Naturopath and a Wellness Coach, Holistic Nutritionist or Herbalist?
  • “My dream is that my students will get these credentials and then they will go on to become D.O’s (doctor of osteopathy), M.D.’s, N.D.’s, psychologist, psychiatrist, nurses, massage therapists and anything in the health field – and then we will all have this holistic background… we will just add holistic healing to the world.” – Lori Rose, PhD
  • Will exercise education be included in this program?
  • “I think a very important part of this field is to avoid the competitive nature that is in a lot of other fields… with scarcity mentality… You’re not competitors, you’re partners.” – Lori Rose, PhD

 

Contributing Podcaster, Lori Rose, PhD’s teaches

“Everything You Need to Know About Sun Health” 

Demo, e-booklet + 3 Recipes!

How much sun is ok?

What about kids?

 +++

Free for a limited time – Join us!

Learn more here.

 

 

Lori RoseHi everyone! I am Lori Valentine Rose, PhD, board certified nutrition professional (CNP), board certified holistic nutrition consultant (BCHN), registered herbalist (AHG), wellness coach, teacher, wife, and mom.  I am a passionate studier of nutrition, herbalism, spirituality, and pretty much anything that makes our minds, bodies, souls, and planet a better place to inhabit.  I have taught biology and nutrition at a local community college for around ten years, have been back-yard organic gardening for around five years, and have been pursuing clinical herbalism for several years.   I recently developed, created, and now instruct the Hill College Holistic Wellness Program, the most thorough, affordable wellness program in the country.  Thanks to my variety of education in how the body works, scientific literacy, environmental impact, and nutrition, I skillfully combine this knowledge to use science-based nutrition and herbalism to address the root cause of your health issues.  I am honored you are here, and hope you will join me on my quest for holistic wellness! Visit Lori’s website here.






, ,

Natural Remedies for Grief with Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall :062

Grief often does just need time for healing, but there are natural and herbal remedies that can ease the process.

 

With over 35 years of nursing experience in the critical care and emergency room – Lora Krall is very familiar with tragedy and grief. As if being present with grieving families over the years was not enough experience; the recent loss of her son and many other family members (30 in total) in a two and half year period, make her even more of an expert.

 

Lora shares from her nursing background, personal grief and herbal training. She has some tremendously valuable insight.

 

wild-violet-flowers-for-grief

 

Here are some highlights of our discussion on grief:

  • Lora began learning about herbs as nutritional support and prevention
  • The lack of support for health professionals to talk about grief
  • Being a community herbalist
  • “There are so many places where herbs and conventional/allopathic medicine can work well together. I see no reason why we can’t use the best of both.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • What our culture sees as acceptable ways and time frames for dealing with grief.
  • Where grief pops up: loss of pets, family members, a job, a home, an idea, a dream…
  • What happens when people do not deal with their grief?
  • Go spend time in nature. That is so incredibly healing.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • Death builds life.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • Hawthorn blend: Mimosa bark, Hawthorn, lavender – causes a gentle opening like a flower for a heart closed by grief.
  • The subtle, gentle effects of herbs.
  • Herbal stories
  • Grief in a community
  • “Violet helps you in the journey from the head to the heart.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • “Borage gives you courage and helps you stand up and face the world.”  – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • How do you deal with death as in an ending of a relationship where you may encounter the situation or people again? Ceremony: write letters and burn them as a method of release, nurture the loss especially when it’s between two females (motherwort)
  • Violet is also known as “Heart Ease” – the metaphors in our language.
  • When you (or a friend is) are sick to death: Linden Flower, Lavender, Chamomile in a foot bath – and some Rosemary for remembrance and peppermint to move things along.
  • Letting go of grief for ideas and dreams that have never come to be.
  • What to do and not to do with someone who is grieving. (Don’t not talk about IT.) Use light touch, not smothering hugs. If you bring food, keep it light: nutritious soups, light teas, juices and things that are easy to make. Not heavy, creamy hot dishes. Just saying, “I’m thinking of you.” is enough.
  • Are there cultures that deal with grief “better”?
  • What can we do to deal with grief better? Lora shares about the “Spirit Bowl”. Honoring the loss of a family member for a year to allow them to integrate into their new environment. This can be done by creating an altar for the one who has passed.
  • How Lora and her husband support one another in the loss of their son.
  • Men and grief.

Lora’s handout “Herbs for Grieving Process”

Lora’s website.

 

About Lora Krall

Nurse Herbalist Lora KrallI am as much a part of what I see as it is a part of me. We are all one.  I despise labels and boxes instead preferring the gray zones of life that allow us to change and grow, adapt and integrate.  I am a wife, a mother, a sister, a daughter. I have had careers as a nurse, gardener, coordinator, barista, caretaker and teacher. I am passionate about equality for all, education, and the environment in all its many forms.  I love to read, write, research, learn, explore, garden, hike, camp, travel, cook, create and just be.  While the many roles we play in our lives shape and form, it is the stories we create that tell who we are .  I hope you will join me as I share some of my story.

 





,

Herbalist Matthew Wood :050

In this interview herbalist Matthew Wood shares his journey to becoming a master herbalist

Matthew is so passionate about plants, teaching and otherwise sharing his knowledge that we rarely get to here about him; how he was lead to and became an herbalist! He was gracious to spend some time for this interview and to share what is a challenging topic for him to cover, himself!

Of Course, Matthew does talk about herbs… he just can’t help it!

 

“I was imbued with that foreign spirit…” – Matthew Wood

“Plants are reference points for consciousness.” – Matthew Wood

Matthew shares:

  • Learning from the Indians
  • Studying in Scotland
  • About the Seminole Indians
  • Yarrow – Achillea millefolium
  • English is a language of commerce
  • Being raised Quaker “Follow your inner light, what works for you.”
  • Being too shy to tell counselors he wanted to be a botanist
  • Studying at the University of Minnesota – graduating with a history degree after 14 years
  • “You really understand [the essence of] that plant, so you get an A.”
  • What he gained from formal training
  • Organic chemistry and alchemy
  • Receiving the “Mantel of Authority and Responsibility”
  • The experience of receiving the “Medical Degree from Mother Nature”
  • Chinese Medicine philosophy (a taste)
  • Yellow Jessamine – Gelsemium sempervirens
  • Do plants from our native region more helpful to us?
  • Herbal trade history
  • Black cohosh – Actaea racemosa
  • Do you need to have a “degree from the plant realm” to be an herbalist?
  • Plantain – Plantago major
  • A confidence boosting message for new herbalists!
  • How to speak and understand like an herbalist
  • The spirit and soul world… more to come!

 

“You can be a master from day one, you just need to know what one herb does reliably.” 

– Matthew Wood

 

 

About Matthew Wood

“A Real Live Herbalist” 

Matthew Wood has been a practicing herbalist since 1982. In a period when many authors and lecturers are merely “arm chair herbalists” who offer theories and opinions based on book learning, and others have turned to the exotic traditions of India or China, he has been an active practitioner of traditional Western herbalism. He has helped tens of thousands of clients over the years, with many difficult health problems. While Matthew believes in the virtue of many other healing modalities, he has always been inspired to learn, preserve, and practice the tradition of herbal medicine descending to us from our European, Anglo-American, and Native American heritage. He is a member of the American Herbalists Guild (registered herbalist) and has earned his Masters of Science degree from the Scottish School of Herbal Medicine (accredited by the University of Wales). Visit Matthew’s Website here