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Natural Remedies for Grief with Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall :062

Grief often does just need time for healing, but there are natural and herbal remedies that can ease the process.

 

With over 35 years of nursing experience in the critical care and emergency room – Lora Krall is very familiar with tragedy and grief. As if being present with grieving families over the years was not enough experience; the recent loss of her son and many other family members (30 in total) in a two and half year period, make her even more of an expert.

 

Lora shares from her nursing background, personal grief and herbal training. She has some tremendously valuable insight.

 

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Here are some highlights of our discussion on grief:

  • Lora began learning about herbs as nutritional support and prevention
  • The lack of support for health professionals to talk about grief
  • Being a community herbalist
  • “There are so many places where herbs and conventional/allopathic medicine can work well together. I see no reason why we can’t use the best of both.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • What our culture sees as acceptable ways and time frames for dealing with grief.
  • Where grief pops up: loss of pets, family members, a job, a home, an idea, a dream…
  • What happens when people do not deal with their grief?
  • Go spend time in nature. That is so incredibly healing.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • Death builds life.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • Hawthorn blend: Mimosa bark, Hawthorn, lavender – causes a gentle opening like a flower for a heart closed by grief.
  • The subtle, gentle effects of herbs.
  • Herbal stories
  • Grief in a community
  • “Violet helps you in the journey from the head to the heart.” – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • “Borage gives you courage and helps you stand up and face the world.”  – Nurse Herbalist Lora Krall
  • How do you deal with death as in an ending of a relationship where you may encounter the situation or people again? Ceremony: write letters and burn them as a method of release, nurture the loss especially when it’s between two females (motherwort)
  • Violet is also known as “Heart Ease” – the metaphors in our language.
  • When you (or a friend is) are sick to death: Linden Flower, Lavender, Chamomile in a foot bath – and some Rosemary for remembrance and peppermint to move things along.
  • Letting go of grief for ideas and dreams that have never come to be.
  • What to do and not to do with someone who is grieving. (Don’t not talk about IT.) Use light touch, not smothering hugs. If you bring food, keep it light: nutritious soups, light teas, juices and things that are easy to make. Not heavy, creamy hot dishes. Just saying, “I’m thinking of you.” is enough.
  • Are there cultures that deal with grief “better”?
  • What can we do to deal with grief better? Lora shares about the “Spirit Bowl”. Honoring the loss of a family member for a year to allow them to integrate into their new environment. This can be done by creating an altar for the one who has passed.
  • How Lora and her husband support one another in the loss of their son.
  • Men and grief.

Lora’s handout “Herbs for Grieving Process”

Lora’s website.

 

About Lora Krall

Nurse Herbalist Lora KrallI am as much a part of what I see as it is a part of me. We are all one.  I despise labels and boxes instead preferring the gray zones of life that allow us to change and grow, adapt and integrate.  I am a wife, a mother, a sister, a daughter. I have had careers as a nurse, gardener, coordinator, barista, caretaker and teacher. I am passionate about equality for all, education, and the environment in all its many forms.  I love to read, write, research, learn, explore, garden, hike, camp, travel, cook, create and just be.  While the many roles we play in our lives shape and form, it is the stories we create that tell who we are .  I hope you will join me as I share some of my story.

 





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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Help for Veterans (and everyone!) :032

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, is a very real thing for many individuals

Nicole Lovald, a trained counselor, life coach, yoga teacher and yoga studio, owner shares in this interview how she was initiated into helping veterans (and civilians) with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Married to a service member, Nicole has a unique perspective and insight to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Watch or listen for the fullest content and experience!

 

So, first of all, what is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?

Post Traumatic Stress is a very normal reaction to a very abnormal situation.

“When someone is threatened in some way, perceived or real, they will experience increased stress. This stress continues to go with them after the experience and therefor it becomes post traumatic stress.” – Nicole Lovald

Examples of how Post Traumatic Stress Disorder begins

  • Car accident particularly where a person feels their life was threatened
  • Sexual assault
  • Domestic Violence
  • Mugging
  • When you are truly concerned for your life and your safety

 

What can Trigger a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction?

Regarding veterans, It’s usually something associated with what they saw, smelled or experience while they were in this threatening situation:

  • Blast sounds, ex. fireworks
  • Strobe lights
  • Being unsure of surroundings
  • Flat tires

 

Are certain people more susceptible to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?

It comes down to resiliency. Some people are more resilient than other. Some of this is resiliency we see to be born with and some of this is learned.

 

What can someone keep in mind when living with or serving a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?

  • Make sure that they feel safe. Avoid surprises.
  • Allow the person to be aware of their environment.
  • Be careful about the language you use. For example, in her yoga classes, Nicole does not use the common pose “corpse pose” because it can be a trigger.
  • Be gentle with yourself too. You’re not going to be perfect. You can put yourself in their shoes, but not in their minds. Communicate- ask them!

 

How does yoga help Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Nicole shares how her husband, a long-time service member, came to know, experience and benefit from yoga. He’s become a better dad (not that he was a bad dad, Nicole confirms) but he is less short-tempered, especially when coming back from deployment. He’s able to respond instead of just blowing up and reacting; he has more resiliency. Now he’s pretty much addicted to his weekly yoga class. It helps his body and clears his mind. It’s not normal for him to relax, so this gives him the ability to self-regulate and calm down.

 

If you have signs or have been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, is yoga the only answer?

Finding help is the answer. The suicide rates for veterans are unbelievable and it’s sad. Reach out for help. People love you and care about you. It doesn’t matter if it’s yoga, just get help.

If you’re not ready to dive into yoga, start with breathing exercises. Mental health clinics and doctor’s offices are providing more.

Also, meditation helps a lot.  UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center is a non-secular resource.

Could I be affected by Post Traumatic Stress and not even know it, even those who are not veterans?

Nicole explains there is a natural state that we want to be in, it’s homeostasis; it’s what is called in counseling “the window of tolerance”. This is where out body can self-regulate well: blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, etc.

Then there’s the hyper-aroused state and the hypo-aroused state.

The hyper-aroused state is when you feel anxious. If you’re feeling jittery, your heart is beating harder or faster in your chest, and you just can’t seem to calm down, your just reacting and just can’t get to the more natural, level state then you need help. This is not where your body is supposed to function on a regular basis.

The hypo-aroused state is when you feel lethargic or depressed (this does not necessarily you’ve been diagnosed as depressed) but you just feel like you can’t get out of bed, you don’t have energy, you don’t want to talk to friends or family- this is not a natural state of being.

Even though it’s especially difficult when we feel in the hyper or hypo states, we need to reach out to a friend and ask to talk or go for a walk. Connect with others who can support you.

 

Resources and Links

Yoga Veterans Project

Wounded Warrior Project

UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center

Nicole is offering a class for yoga teachers and professionals who want to learn better how to work with people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in April, 2017. Healing Through Yoga: Trauma Sensitive Training

About Nicole Lovald

Nicole Lovald is a Certified Yoga Instructor and Life/Wellness Coach with a Master’s degree in Counseling. She has spent over 15 years working in higher education, social services, non-profit, and for-profit settings. Her love of yoga began many years ago when her husband was deployed and she was looking for a self-care practice to ease her worried mind and untangle the stress induced knots in her body.
What she found was that yoga provided amazing benefits that not only impacted her body but also relaxed her mind and allowed her to get in touch with her inner spirit. After realizing the wonderful benefits of her practice, she decided to embark on a yoga teacher training program so that she would be able to bring it to others. She has now been teaching yoga for over 4 years and is thrilled to be able to help others live healthier and happier lives.
As the owner of Spirit of the Lake Yoga and Wellness Center, Nicole is excited to continue to support the Excelsior and surrounding communities. In addition to teaching several classes at Spirit of the Lake she also provides individual wellness and life coaching sessions.







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Spirit of the Lake Yoga – On and Off the Mat :008

Spirit of the Lake Yoga is a lovely studio near Lake Minnetonka in Minnesota.

 

In this interview, (now) yoga studio owner Nicole Lovald, shares how she came to yoga while her husband was deployed in Iraq, and how yoga helped her to cope with her many thoughts, concerns and challenges as she was faced with raising their 2 year old son alone during that time.

 

Several years later she and her husband are owners of an award-winning yoga studio, and take the goodness of yoga beyond the mat to their community.

 

Nicole recounts her first yoga class she went to: that for first time, since her husband had left for Iraq, her mind was silent. She remembers leaving class feeling better. This was enough to convince herself to go to class weekly!

 

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She admits that her friends could tell if she missed a class, because with yoga she was a calmer, happier, easier person to be around.

 

 

“When you support your body… you can release… muscles, emotions, tension… Whatever is challenging you at the time.” – Nicole

 

 

Not too long after Nicole took a yoga teacher training course, never with the intention to teach (or own a studio for that matter) but to understand better what was going on that caused the great changes she felt in herself.

 

Some other things we talk about in this episode:

  • How she and her husband came to be owners of Spirit of the Lake
  • How Nicole and her husband have a special desire to work with veterans
  • Is yoga a religion?
  • Stand-up Paddleboard (SUP) yoga
  • Nicole’s passion for working with kids – especially little kids.
  • How they are taking yoga off the mat and support the community

 

“You don’t have to be flexible in body, but be flexible in mind.” – Nicole

 

What’s unique about Spirit of the Lake Yoga:

 

Family friendly programs for all ages!

Online programs:

  • Intro to meditation
  • Soulful self-care
  • Mindful parenting
  • Mindful eating

Spirit of the Midwest Yoga Festival

“We can still focus on the good even when we’re dealing with trauma, even when we’re dealing with sadness. It’s important to let that sadness move through us.” – Nicole

 2 Tips on How to Feel More Balanced in Times of Stress and Despair

  • Let “that” emotion move through you (rather than stuffing it). Which leads to illness and disease. Restorative and Yin yoga for example allow us to be quiet and to release.
  • Breathe – “We take our breath for granted… Our breath is our life-force…. It’s what gives us vitality… It’s what helps us to move those emotions through…”  Learn to breathe into the belly.

 

 

How Yoga Helps us With Everyday Things – Like Kids

Nicole is adamant that she shares parenting tips not because she is the perfect parent, but because so many of the mindfulness techniques taught in yoga (and in former training) have helped her to be a better parent. She suggests to bring in mindfulness (bring awareness into the here and now). This helps a parent to take the time to respond to a situation rather than hastily reacting. Kids can eventually learn to model this mindfulness behavior also!

 

 

“Try to find moments, where you truly see your children… experience with them.” – Nicole

 

 

“I just keep thinking how much my teenage years would have been had I had yoga then… Self-esteem, self-confidence…” – Nicole

 

 

Listen to the podcast to hear how Nicole beautifully explains the how-to and the benefits of these tips. 

 

 

About Nicole Lovald

 

Nicole Lovald is a Certified Yoga Instructor and Life/Wellness Coach with a Master’s degree in Counseling. She has spent over 15 years working in higher education, social services, non-profit, and for-profit settings. Her love of yoga began many years ago when her husband was deployed and she was looking for a self-care practice to ease her worried mind and untangle the stress induced knots in her body.
What she found was that yoga provided amazing benefits that not only impacted her body but also relaxed her mind and allowed her to get in touch with her inner spirit. After realizing the wonderful benefits of her practice, she decided to embark on a yoga teacher training program so that she would be able to bring it to others. She has now been teaching yoga for over 4 years and is thrilled to be able to help others live healthier and happier lives.
As the owner of Spirit of the Lake Yoga and Wellness Center, Nicole is excited to continue to support the Excelsior and surrounding communities. In addition to teaching several classes at Spirit of the Lake she also provides individual wellness and life coaching sessions.
nicole